Category: Displays

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LAPSCREEN with faytech, 12.5″ Type-C Display, runs off DP phone/laptop/anything

Posted by Charbax – December 30, 2018

Michél Haese shows LAPSCREEN manufactured by faytech. This video also features Arne Weber, the managing founder of faytech. Here demonstrating Lapscreen with a Huawei P20, using the Smartphone's CPU/Memory?Connectivity and Battery to power the LAPSCREEN with its 12.5” FHD display, available both non-touch for around $200 and touch version for about $300, shipping in January. The concept is for Lapscreen to be so thin and lightweight it can fit inside an A4-envelope. LAPSCREEN displays the Huawei P20 either in work station mode with all the office tools or one can play any mobile games on a large 12.5” screen instead of the display of a tiny mobile phone. With just around 5W power consumption, the mobile phone's battery is enough to also run the LAPSCREEN for several hours on a charge, there is also a PD Power Delivery port on the Lapscreen to power the Lapscreen and charge the mobile phone at the same time.

Michél also presents the set up of using LAPSCREEN on different macbooks, showing how one can connect up to 4 LAPSCREENS to just one macbook. There is also an HDMI input on every LAPSCREEN, to connect any HDMI source, any media player, notebook, WiFi/Miracast-dongle, even game consoles like the Nintendo Switch or the iPhone via a lightning to HDMI-cable are perfectly presented on the LAPSCREEN too.

Nanosys Quantum Dots, CEO Jason Hartlove Interview

Posted by Charbax – December 23, 2018

Nanosys CEO Jason Hartlove talks at Nanosys Silicon Valley headquarters, talks about how his company helped make Quantum Dots a success in the market, where it's going next. Topics include the story behind the development of the first quantum dot products, the quantum mechanics of how a quantum dot actually works, as well as a look at the long term roadmap for the technology from QDEF and QDOG to QDCC to QDEL displays of the future.

Nanosys has been at the center of the Quantum Dot universe from the beginning. Founded in 2001 by scientists from UC Berkeley and MIT who helped discover the technology in the early 1980’s, Nanosys finally solved the product/market fit for Quantum Dots by developing a simple component called QDEF.

Ten years ago Quantum Dots were a relative unknown. Mostly a research curiosity, the nanotechnology’s unique ability to convert energy into light captivated the imaginations of scientists who envisioned amazing applications in dozens of industries from solar to printing, to displays and to defense. But commercial success remained out of reach, even decades after its initial discovery. Fast forward to today, “Quantum Dot” is a household name and can be found plastered on the packaging for millions of TVs, monitors and tablets around the world.

Visionect Digital Signage at SID Display Week 2018

Posted by Charbax – September 4, 2018

Filmed at the I-Zone demo and prototype area at SID Display Week, the world's largest and best exhibition for electronic information display technology.

Visionect deploys digital signs using e-paper in environments where they could not have been used before, like medical offices. Their electronic paper technology uses ultra-low power consumption and is deployed without wires, changing the way information is delivered. It utilizes a “place & play” approach that makes it easy to use and easy to install with leading-edge design. Shown here is the “Joan,”, their popular line of room-scheduling products.

Display Week’s I-Zone, sponsored by E Ink, is a unique exhibition-within-the-exhibition filled with demos and prototypes from around the world. Every year, dozens of applicants submit their pre-market and emerging products to compete for a free booth where they can share their inventions with buyers, manufacturers, potential partners, industry leaders and thousands of attendees.

Ioannis (John) Kymissis of Lumiode Shares Insights at SID Display Week 2018

Posted by Charbax – September 3, 2018

John Kymissis, founder & board member of Lumiode, discusses their high-brightness micro-displays for augmented reality and other display applications that pertain to augmented and virtual reality; OLED, micro-LEDS, the evolution of LCD, and a host of leading edge technologies that are moving at the speed of light.

Mr. Kysmiss was chosen as a 2018 SID Fellow during the show for his contributions to the field. Lumiode participated in Display Week’s first Student Job Fair, hoping to attract bright young minds for its organization.

Display Week is the where the world’s display tech industry meets to see and be seen from attendees at each stage of the supply chain. Display Week 2019 will be held in San Jose, California, May 12-17.

faytech Touch PCs at Computex 2018

Posted by Charbax – July 18, 2018

Johanna, Peter and Anna of faytech give a tour of the faytech booth at Computex 2018. This will be the 5th time faytech is exhibiting at Computex to show some of their standard products, but special projects also.

The 55” IP65 Touch PC Kiosk is shown, which is perfect for outdoor usage. It is water- and dust proof and has 1000+ nits of brightness. Besides this, you can also see the 32” Open Frame (HDK) Touch Monitor, with 1000+ nits and is Optically Bonded. It is the perfect solution for integration into a machine or wall. After that, the special project for bus application is also introduced, which uses a 10.1” IP65 Capacitive Touch Monitor with high brightness, RFID scanner and special buttons on the front. Then, the 21.5” Docking station PC with new design is shown, which uses a 100-pin connector and magnets to attach the LCD Panel to the Industrial PC, which is revolutionary in its use! After that, Anna takes over and introduces the 15” IP65 High Brightness Touch Monitor, which uses an All-In-One Cable, perfect for outdoor usage. Then the 15” Capacitive Touch PC with Ubuntu OS is introduced. And at last, the 21.5” V40 Embedded PC is introduced by Peter, which uses Android OS.

LG 77″ Flexible OLED, 1443ppi VR made with Google, LTPS for automotive, LG Nanocell

Posted by Charbax – July 12, 2018

Tour of the LG Display booth at SID Display Week 2018 featuring LG's 77" transparent and flexible OLED display showcasing LG’s expertise in manufacturing large OLED displays made on clear polyimide then separated from the glass plate using a laser process.

LG 65” Crystal Sound OLED generates sound on the surface of the OLED display (as used in the Sony OLED TVs). LG has sticked two small ‘exciters’ at the back to turn the OLED panel into a speaker

LG shows a high resolution 4.3-inch 5K VR display with a density of 1,443ppi developed in collaboration with Google, it is a white OLED with color filters. The brightness is only 150 nits which would not be high enough for a smartphone display but is sufficient for Virtual Reality headsets.

For the automotive displays demos, LG uses the same LTPS technology commonly found in mobile phones to make car displays, a new car dashboard concept that includes displays in the center of the dash as well as one each for the driver and passenger. This trend is intended to replace all the mechanical display modules with interactive touchscreens. The passenger display, which was much larger than the one for the driver, provides access to multiple functions, like movies, messaging and other kinds of media.

LG Nanocell TV technology to compete with the Quantum Dot. They have small nanoparticle which are 1nm in size inside the color filters.

This is a tour with Dr Guillaume Chansin, Technology Consultant at Irimitech.

Roger Stewart, President of Sourland Mountain Associates

Posted by Charbax – July 12, 2018

Roger Stewart, President of Sourland Moutain Associates is an expert in technical knowledge of RFID, a designer in liquid crystal displays, semiconductors and a patent expert. He has executive level experience at three successful start-up companies and discusses his work with liquid crystal displays and various emerging technologies, at the SID Display Week 2018 event.

Levering his knowledge as a historian, Stewart goes on to discuss the evolution and history behind liquid crystal displays. Stewart developed the electronics that goes around the display. He was elected in 2010 as a Fellow of the Society of Information Display Week and the author of 93 papers published.

LCD interview with Professor Vladimir G. Chigrinov, HKUST Energy Institute

Posted by Charbax – July 12, 2018

Professor Vladimir G. Chigrinov is a renowned specialist in liquid crystal optics and photonics. Professor Vladimir G. Chigrinov is an author and coauthor of 4 books, more than 20 reviews and book chapters, 180 journal papers, 420 conference presentations and 60 patents or patent applications in the field of liquid crystals. He is a Member of the International Liquid Crystal Society and the Society for International Display (SID), as well as a member of Editorial Board of "Liquid Crystals Today", “Photonics Letters of Poland” and an Associate Editor of “Journal of the SID”.

He is the only SID Fellow in Russia and Eastern Europe. He won the Research Excellence Award of SENG, HKUST, that recognizes the efforts of an outstanding faculty member in May 2012. Prof Chigrinov served as Associate Editor of J. SID, Member of Editorial Board of three other International journals, Chair of three International Conferences in 2010, 2012 and 2014, and has attended more than 50 plenary, invited and tutorial talks in about 100 prestige International Conferences since 1974.

Martin Schadt (LCD TN inventor) 80th birthday cake at LCD’s 50th anniversary at SID DisplayWeek 2018

Posted by Charbax – July 12, 2018

Martin Schadt and Wolfgang Helfrich invented the twisted nematic field effect (TN-effect) in the Central Research Laboratories of F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, in Basel, Switzerland. The resulting patent CH532261 was licensed worldwide to electronics and watch industries and thus initiated a paradigm change towards flat panel field effect LCD.

In the early 1970s, Martin Schadt started to investigate correlations between liquid crystal molecular structures, material properties, electro-optical effects and display performance to obtain criteria for novel, effect-specific liquid crystal materials for TN- and subsequent field-effect applications. His interdisciplinary approach involving physics and chemistry became the basis for modern industrial Liquid Crystal LC-materials research and led to the discovery and production of numerous new functional molecules and new electro-optical effects. In 1970, shortly after the invention of the TN-effect, he developed the first commercial room temperature nematic liquid crystal mixture with positive dielectric anisotropy, used in the displays of the first Japanese digital TN-LCD watches. The pharmaceutical company Roche established itself as a major supplier of liquid crystal materials for the emerging LCD-industry.

Apart from his pioneering work on the TN-effect (i.e.e twisted nematic field effect), novel liquid crystal materials, organic semiconductors and biophysics, he invented or co-invented the following effects and technologies:

- first organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (1969 as post-doc at Canada's NRC; US patent 3,621,321),
- Kerr effect in LCs (1972),
- field-induced guest-host color switching (1979),
- dual frequency addressing and materials (1982),
- optical mode interference (OMI)-effect (1987,)
- deformed helix ferroelectric (DHF)- and short pitch bi-stable ferroelectric (SBF)-effect (1989, 1990),
- linearly photo-polymerisation (LPP)-technology (1991).

As principal inventor and head of Roche LC research he promoted the development of LPP-Photo-alignment into manufacturing (1992–2002). As a key technology it enables contact free alignment and photo-patterning of monomeric and polymeric liquid crystals by optical means instead of mechanically. This has opened up novel display configurations as well as a wide range of new optical thin-film elements on single substrates, such as LC-interference color filters, optical retarders, cholesteric optical filters, wide-view films to enhance the field of view of LCDs, novel optical security elements for document and brand protection, stereo-polarizers as well as nano-and micro-corrugated optical polymer thin-film elements enabling polymeric antireflective and directional light scattering coatings.

The molecular design approach of Martin Schadt and his team has led to the discovery, patenting and production of the following commercially important liquid crystal classes: alkyl cyano Schiff'bases and esters (1971), phenyl-pyrimidines (1977), alkenyl liquid crystals which have become key for all state-of-the-art high-information content LCDs (1985–1995), numerous halogenated liquid crystals (1989–1995) as well as the first strongly non-linear optical (NLO)-ferroelectric liquid crystals (1992).

Until 1994 Martin Schadt was the head of the Liquid Crystal Research division of F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. As a spin-off from Hoffmann-La Roche in 1994 he founded the interdisciplinary research and development company ROLIC Ltd. From 1994 until his retirement from the operating business in October 2002 Martin Schadt was CEO of ROLIC Ltd. and delegate of the board of directors. He retired from ROLIC in 2005 and is now active as a scientific advisor to various research groups and governmental agencies.

Martin Schadt has published 167 scientific papers, co-authored four books and holds 116 patents, and previously received the Roche Research and Development Prize and Karl Ferdinand Braun Prize of the American Society for Information Display (SID); highest recognition Award of SID.

E Ink e-Tile for large area displays by Makoto Omodani, Faculty Director Tokai University

Posted by Charbax – July 12, 2018

Mokoto Omodani, Faculty Director of Tokai University presents a paper entitled, “Concept of e-Tile and its Prototyping” at the DisplayWeek event, the largest gathering of display professionals.

“e‐Tile” is a novel concept for large area displays, is introduced. A typical e‐Tile configuration, in which 100 pixels are mounted on a 100 mm square board, is designed and prototyped. One promising application is the unobtrusive information board, which is far less annoying than the conventional vivid LED/LCD in public spaces.

The expectations for Electronic Paper can be summarized as flexibility, readability, and multi‐functionality with the goal of readability. Paper‐like readability should be accepted as the most important target of Electronic Paper, when we consider that no existing electronic display is as comfortable to read as paper.