Category: ARM TechCon

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Minix TV Boxes at ARM Techcon 2016

Posted by stromium – November 26, 2016

Minix is a Hong Kong-based set top box manufacturer that has on display their entire range here. The bestselling model uses an RK3188 CPU (quad-core Cortex-A9) with an Ethernet port, 1GB RAM and 16GB of NAND flash. The X7 and X7 mini, their most mature platform, is used by companies to use their own software which is then sold to end consumers utilising digital signage. The S905 uses a 64-bit CPU, and supports 30fps 4K video. There is also a model with a 3G/4G SIM card and a PCI-E port for adding faster wireless cards or SSDs.

ComTech IoT location providing hardware and software

Posted by stromium – November 26, 2016

ComTech, a company that makes location offerings, is displaying here their solutions for obtaining location on ARM mbed. On display are three mbed setups that use cellular networks, GPS, and WiFi. The company provides the APIs and the SDKs to ARM mbed, and offer a cloud service for assistance in finding locations.

DevicePilot IoT operational management

Posted by stromium – November 26, 2016

Keith Reed, CEO of DevicePilot, explains about operational management in IoT. The company helps companies that deploy smart solutions, to ensure that their smart devices are kept up-to-date with the latest firmware and that they are functional. An example for the company is one of their clients that supply fire alarms - DevicePilot assists in ensuring that the alarms are functional.

SpinDance IoT development service for ARM mbed Ecosystem

Posted by stromium – November 26, 2016

Tom Miller, VP of Marketing for SpinDance, discusses the functions of the company. SpinDance provides turnkey solutions for companies that want to make smart products. Their demo product is one that is intended to be used for disasters/emergencies; it consists of a split ball that can be thrown into a collapsed building, for example, to detect sound and measure temperature, humidity and air pressure.

ATGames Zuma Gamers Portal, gameplay streaming, chat, interactive

Posted by stromium – November 26, 2016

ATgames shows their ARM Powered video game streaming platform, streaming retro games and any game, their game broadcasting platform runs on the ARM Cortex-A15 server chip previously developed by Calxeda. The Zuma service client captures screenshots from a user which is then uploaded to their server. They also have on display the consoles, one being a handheld Sega/Atari console running on ARM Cortex-A7, and a Sega Genesis console running on ARM Cortex-A9. The company has apps for both Windows and Android.

Cavium Octeon TX, 64bit ARMv8 for networking, security and storage

Posted by stromium – November 21, 2016

Cavium, a fabless semiconductor company based in California, has on display here their Octeon TX 81XX board. It has a quad-core ARMv8 processor for embedded applications, going up to 24 cores. The demo setup consists of an IoT gateway, using temperature and humidity sensors. It can use Bluetooth, WiFi, or cellular data.

Silicon Labs Flex Gecko 32bit wireless SoC

Posted by stromium – November 21, 2016

Silicon Labs, a US-based silicon, software and IoT developer, has demoed here their Flex Gecko 32-bit wireless multi-protocol SoC that runs on ARM's mbed platform. It has support for 2.4GHz frequency band and 6LoWPAN, allowing for transmission over IEEE 802.15.4. It can also support Bluetooth Low Energy specification. The MCU can use ARM Cortex-M3 or M4 for processing. If you have a license for white band or sub Ghz band then it can also be configured to send and receive the data at 600Mhz and 700Mhz. It can work with a power as high as 20 dBm.

Mentor Graphics at ARM TechCon 2016 shows Games, Industrial Robots, Medical Devices and Security

Posted by Charbax – November 5, 2016

Ricardo Anguiano of Mentor Graphics describes a memory wall game demo built with the Nucleus RTOS and thirty six NXP FRDM-K64F boards and touchscreens, plus a Boundary Devices BD-SL-i.MX6 game controller which also runs the Nucleus RTOS. Phong Chau of Cepheid discusses their new GeneXpert Omni, a point of care molecular diagnostic system built with Mentor Embedded Linux. Also covered in the video is a Mentor Graphics industrial automation robot demo which runs both the safety-critical functionality and the HMI control running on the same SoC using hardware enforced separation with implications for safety certification feasibility and safety certification cost control. The video ends with a brief computer security discussion, how security doesn't lend itself to soundbites, and how the industry still makes the same security mistakes we were making since the 60s and how security applies to the Internet of Things and to the Automotive market.

Red Hat on ARM Servers, growth opportunities at ARM Techcon 2016

Posted by Charbax – November 4, 2016

Jon Masters, Chief ARM Architect at RedHat and Yan Fisher, RedHat Hyperscale Platforms Product Marketing Lead, talk about the traction in the industry for the ARM Servers, where Red Hat talks about running the same unmodified OS on 10 different ARM SoC vendor's hardware, where Red Hat expects significant adoption in the next 12 months as customers ask for Linux on ARM, Red Hat can help these customers deploy, support and upgrade. As next generation better ARM Server solutions are getting ready to be deployed. ARM was talking about 20% of new servers by 2020 could be ARM Servers, Red Hat is bullish and thinks it could be higher.

ARM Powered Shoe Kiss & Tell

Posted by Charbax – November 1, 2016

Kiss & Tell, an ARM Powered Shoe. Kiss & Tell was a concept that turned into a reality all done on ARM Technology. The idea, a shoe that can change the patterns on the straps based on the touch of a finger from an app on your mobile. For example, if you were invited to have tea with the Queen, the Union Jack could be displayed in seconds; if it was Valentine’s Day, hearts could be flashing. The sole, upper, and interchangeable heels were designed in Tinkercad on an ARM Powered Chromebook, printed using an ARM Powered 3D printer, and then spray painted with custom car paint. The circuitry and the LED designs were both done on Raspberry Pi 3. The shoe is powered by an ARM Cortex-M0+ that sits on an Arduino MKR1000 board that is hidden in the shoe’s upper. You can contact Sandra Larrabee of ARM Marketing to learn more about ARM or Kiss & Tell here: sandra.larrabee@arm.com