Category: Sensors

Lowest Power WiFi in the World: Atmel | SMART SAM W25 Wi-Fi for IoT with ARM Cortex-M0+ with up to 10 years of battery life

Posted by – March 26, 2015

The Atmel | SMART SAM W25 Wi-Fi module brings the world's lowest power Wi-Fi module with their ARM Cortex-M0+ microcontroller and the Atmel WINC1500 low-power Wi-Fi 2.4GHz IEEE 802.11 b/g/n SoC (System on Chip) optimized for the IoT market. It provides integrated software solution with application and security protocols such as TLS, integrated network services (TCP/IP stack) which are available through Atmel’s Studio 6 integrated development platform (IDP). The Atmel SMART SAM W25 Wi-Fi module can run Wi-Fi for IoT applications for upwards more than 10 years on AAA batteries when pulling IoT data at a 30 minute interval speed.

$10 Cypress PSoC ARM Cortex-M3 Programmable System-on-Chip

Posted by – March 26, 2015

Cypress makes programmable system-on-chip solutions used in a wide range of applications, from consumer and automotive to industrial and military products. They are launching the $10 CY8KIT-059 development board to program their ARM Cortex-M3 PSoC 5LP at http://www.cypress.com/?rid=108038 The Cypress PSoC platform includes several families of devices that feature an ARM Cortex processor surrounded by a host of programmable analog and digital resources that can easily be customized with a simple drag-and-drop design tool called PSoC Creator. Cypress’s newest PSoC innovation includes the PSoC 4 M-Series, which, with its 32-bit ARM Cortex M0- core, 128KB of flash, programmable analog and digital components, dual CAN interfaces and 55 GPIOs, make it an ideal replacement for standard 8-bit and 16-bit applications. Another recent Cypress innovation is the Cypress PSoC 4 BLE, which adds Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity to any device, and is ideal for a variety of wireless applications from fitness and health-monitoring wearables to sensor-based systems in homes.

Atmel | SMART SAM S70 and E70 ARM Cortex-M7 (World’s fastest ARM Cortex-M)

Posted by – March 17, 2015

The Atmel | SMART SAM S70 and E70 microcontrollers are based on the high-performance 32-bit ARM Cortex-M7 RISC processors with double precision floating point unit. They operate at a maximum speed of 300MHz and feature up to 2048KB of Flash, dual 16KB of cache memory and up to 384KB of SRAM. They can achieve 1500 CoreMarks or up to 645 DMIPS. On the memory side, they have a flexible SRAM which can be configured as Tightly Coupled Memory (TCM) up to 256KB. Allowing execution of deterministic code or fast processing data. Code executed from TCM is executed at full speed so at 300MHz. The SRAM is multi-port which is reducing the latency over the bus matrix. When they have a lot of burst the latency can be reduced by 16 thanks to the 4 ports. To accelerate the execution of the code from on-chip Flash or nonvolatile memory connected to QuadSPI or over the External Bus Interface, they have integrated a huge L1 cache of 16kByte for the instruction and 16kByte for the data. Both with ECC. The 384KByte of SRAM can be extended through the SDRAM interface. Looking at the features now, they have plenty of serial communications such as SPI, SDIO or USART. Atmel has one High-speed USB Host and Device, with integrated PHY which obviously save some cost and PCB space. There is one CMOS Camera interface for image acquisition. All the series offer two Advanced Analog Frontend (AFE) with Dual Sample and hold capability and Up to 16-bit resolution with hardware oversampling. They also have programmable Gain for small signal input. All series offer real-time event management through direct connection between PWM, Timer and ADC for motor control application. Both series are based on the same feature set, the only difference is coming from the Ethernet, CAN support (SAME70 integrates Ethernet and CAN). Atmel offers all series in BGA and QFP from 64 to 144 pins. Small 64-pin pincount option offers an entry level form factor high performance MCU. All series support the extended Industrial temperature range from -40 to 105°C.

Atmel QTouch Surface Platform, Eirik Slettahjell

Posted by – March 9, 2015

World's lowest power capacitive touch, the new Atmel QTouch Surface platform builds on the market-proven QTouch capacitive touch button sensing technology supported by Atmel | SMART MCUs. The new solution includes an on-chip peripheral touch controller (PTC), the cornerstone technology that enables higher performance capacitive touch on Atmel MCUs. Consuming less than 4µA, the QTouch Surface technology is perfect for wearables and other battery-powered applications that require a capacitive touch user interface.

Google Project Ara development boards at Linaro Connect, Greybus status with Greg Kroah-Hartman

Posted by – February 22, 2015

Greg Kroah-Hartman shows the Google Project Ara prototype phone and development board, and he talks about Greybus the protocol that they are developing to make it possible for these hardware modules that must be able to talk to each other and to the host module, they can be hot swappable, they have to be able to describe themselves so everything just works smoothly, they work on the knowledge that they have from USB, PCI, Firewire and all the previous protocols that people have implemented, they work on the base level of what UniPro can do, and they go from there. This is just another sub-system of Linux that drivers plug into. Rob Herring is the project tech lead at Linaro for Project Ara, and he talks about how the Linaro guys are working on the Kernel portions, the ARM Applications Processor modules and the Android modifications to support hardware modules hotplug in a Smartphone.

ARM mbed OS platform for Internet of Things

Posted by – January 28, 2015

ARM talks sensors to servers demonstrations, ways to implement Internet of Things, using the mbed development boards with Arduino headers, the Arduino Shield with a low-power WiFi, doing custom sensor modules with temperature, microphone, ultra-sonic and motion sensors, stacking them up to do sensor nodes, then putting them around the booth to show a dashboard of things happening at the booth hosted on an AppliedMicro X-Gene server.

Interview with Guillaume, analyst at IDTechEx

Posted by – November 18, 2014

Guillaume Chansin (@GChansin) is one of the analysts from IDTechEx. We meet him in Santa Clara where the company is holding their annual US event. We talk about what we will see during the conference and why printed electronics can help make better wearable devices. He also explains printed sensors, flexible displays, and why we will not see flexible LCD anytime soon.

The IDTechEx event on emerging technologies starts tomorrow

Posted by – November 18, 2014

IDTechEx brings the business and technology communities on key future technologies together at the Santa Clara Convention Center, in California. Their event is focused on some of the most important and most exciting emerging technologies of the future with focus on 3D Printing, Internet of Things, Printed Electronics, Wearable Technologies, Graphene and Supercapacitors. To attract at least 2,500 attendees and more than 200 exhibitors. Hear from the IDTechEx team a day before the conference kicks off. Find out more about the IDTechEx events at: http://www.idtechex.com/events/

Murata Cheerleader Robots on inverted pendulum showcase sensors

Posted by – October 11, 2014

Self-balancing on a ball by inverted pendulum, they dance synchronized, using sensors, cameras and perfect precision in the remote coordination, they demonstrate some of Murata's sensor components and innovation ability. You can watch the rest of the video to see some of Murata's sensors, energy harvesting demonstrations and more.

Moff band, wearable smart toy

Posted by – October 10, 2014

Slap it onto your wrist, and your movements turn into sounds through bluetooth to your smartphone/tablet. Successful on Kickstarter, it has over 30 sounds on the app thus far, you can play air drums, you can sword fight, you can shoot, you can throw ninja weapons or make some magic in the air.