Category: Development Boards

Altera Arria 10 FPGA with dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 on 20nm

Posted by – May 21, 2015

Altera is shipping their second generation ARM Cortex-A9 based FPGA in the Altera Arria 10 FPGA, built on 20nm, running at 1.5 GHz, the ARM processor provides a 50% increase in performance over the previous generation (Altera Arria 5) with also a 30% power reduction. Altera Arria 10 SoCs support secure boot with authentication based on Elliptical Curve Digital Signature Authentication (EC DSA), with a layered public key infrastructure for root of trust support, Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and new anti-tamper features. Altera Arria 10 HPS now has three Ethernet MAC cores, 256 KB Scratch-RAM, supports 8- and 16-bit NAND flash devices, eMMC SD/SDIO/MMC cards, and 72-bit DDR3/4 memory. Altera Arria 10 features the industry’s only midrange 28.3 Gbps support, highest performance 2,666 Mbps DDR4 SDRAM memory interface, IEEE 754-compliant hard floating-point with 1,500 GFLOPS of DSP performance and 96 transceiver lanes deliver 3.6 Tbps of serial bandwidth.

The first ARM processor in the world with Sophie Wilson (Part 2)

Posted by – May 10, 2015

In 1986, Acorn shipped the ARM Development System, the world's first ARM development board to ever be sold with an ARM Processor in it, a Tube-linked second processor for the BBC Master which allowed developers to write programs for ARM! Sophie Wilson, original ARM designer at Acorn Computers, talks about the History of ARM, with the devices that used ARM1, ARM2, ARM3, ARM610 in the Apple Newton and talking about how ARM was spun out of Acorn, how the ARM business model made ARM such a huge worldwide success.

You can also watch Part 1 of my interview with Sophie Wilson here (and check back for Part 3!) this is being filmed at the Center for Computing History in Cambridge

Allwinner H64 Set-top-box development board

Posted by – April 30, 2015

Allwinner H64 OTT box development board is a 64bit Quad core ARM Cortex-A53 with H.265 4K decoding, 4K HDMI output, smart color display with Android 5 Lollipop support.

ARM mbed IoT Starter Kit on IBM’s Bluemix cloud platform

Posted by – April 6, 2015

ARM launches the ARM mbed IoT Starter Kit Ethernet Edition, an extremely easy to use development kit for Internet of Things, to channel data from Internet-connected devices directly into IBM's Bluemix cloud platform. The combination of a secure sensor environment by ARM with cloud-based analytics, mobile and application resources from IBM allows fast prototyping of new smart products and unique value-added services for the IoT market. It is particularly suitable for developers with no specific experience in embedded or web development, as it provides a platform for learning new concepts and creating working prototypes. After the initial out of box experience, the infinite possibilities of cloud applications can be explored through IBM's production grade BlueMix platform, in which deployment and device management is as simple for one device as it is for a million of them. The starter kit hardware can be modified and extended to explore the device design space, and a finalised design can be taken to production using the mbed SDK and HDK.

ARM mbed IoT Starter Kit can be ordered here: https://developer.mbed.org/platforms/IBMEthernetKit/

$10 Cypress PSoC ARM Cortex-M3 Programmable System-on-Chip

Posted by – March 26, 2015

Cypress makes programmable system-on-chip solutions used in a wide range of applications, from consumer and automotive to industrial and military products. They are launching the $10 CY8KIT-059 development board to program their ARM Cortex-M3 PSoC 5LP at http://www.cypress.com/?rid=108038 The Cypress PSoC platform includes several families of devices that feature an ARM Cortex processor surrounded by a host of programmable analog and digital resources that can easily be customized with a simple drag-and-drop design tool called PSoC Creator. Cypress’s newest PSoC innovation includes the PSoC 4 M-Series, which, with its 32-bit ARM Cortex M0- core, 128KB of flash, programmable analog and digital components, dual CAN interfaces and 55 GPIOs, make it an ideal replacement for standard 8-bit and 16-bit applications. Another recent Cypress innovation is the Cypress PSoC 4 BLE, which adds Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity to any device, and is ideal for a variety of wireless applications from fitness and health-monitoring wearables to sensor-based systems in homes.

Radxa Rock2 RK3288 development board

Posted by – March 26, 2015

This is the Radxa Rock2 on Rockchip RK3288 quad-core ARM Cortex-A17, still being optimized for release at http://radxa.com/Rock2 it's configured as a SoM (System on Module) board with a choice of two base boards with more or less connectors and with that SoM module swappable. Tyler Baker of the Linaro LAVA team talks about the connectors and how Linaro is integrating this into http://kernelci.org which you can hear about at http://armdevices.net/2015/02/28/kernelci-org-upstream-kernel-validation-project/

Atmel | SMART SAM S70 and E70 ARM Cortex-M7 (World’s fastest ARM Cortex-M)

Posted by – March 17, 2015

The Atmel | SMART SAM S70 and E70 microcontrollers are based on the high-performance 32-bit ARM Cortex-M7 RISC processors with double precision floating point unit. They operate at a maximum speed of 300MHz and feature up to 2048KB of Flash, dual 16KB of cache memory and up to 384KB of SRAM. They can achieve 1500 CoreMarks or up to 645 DMIPS. On the memory side, they have a flexible SRAM which can be configured as Tightly Coupled Memory (TCM) up to 256KB. Allowing execution of deterministic code or fast processing data. Code executed from TCM is executed at full speed so at 300MHz. The SRAM is multi-port which is reducing the latency over the bus matrix. When they have a lot of burst the latency can be reduced by 16 thanks to the 4 ports. To accelerate the execution of the code from on-chip Flash or nonvolatile memory connected to QuadSPI or over the External Bus Interface, they have integrated a huge L1 cache of 16kByte for the instruction and 16kByte for the data. Both with ECC. The 384KByte of SRAM can be extended through the SDRAM interface. Looking at the features now, they have plenty of serial communications such as SPI, SDIO or USART. Atmel has one High-speed USB Host and Device, with integrated PHY which obviously save some cost and PCB space. There is one CMOS Camera interface for image acquisition. All the series offer two Advanced Analog Frontend (AFE) with Dual Sample and hold capability and Up to 16-bit resolution with hardware oversampling. They also have programmable Gain for small signal input. All series offer real-time event management through direct connection between PWM, Timer and ADC for motor control application. Both series are based on the same feature set, the only difference is coming from the Ethernet, CAN support (SAME70 integrates Ethernet and CAN). Atmel offers all series in BGA and QFP from 64 to 144 pins. Small 64-pin pincount option offers an entry level form factor high performance MCU. All series support the extended Industrial temperature range from -40 to 105°C.

Qualcomm at Linaro Connect, Open Source Freedreno GPU Drivers for Qualcomm Adreno GPUs running on Inforce Computing’s Single-board-computers

Posted by – March 17, 2015

Hacking on Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 and Snapdragon 805 based Inforce Computing single-board-computers, Inforce 6410 and Inforce 6540, in this video, the Qualcomm Linaro Landing Team and Qualcomm Linaro engineers talk about the status of Ubuntu Linux release on Snapdragon 600 processor based development boards. Rob Clark, Freedreno project owner, talks about the status of open source graphics drivers for Qualcomm Adreno processor. The Linaro Linux release uses Freedreno graphics driver for HW acceleration. Other landing team engineers talk about various other plugins and drivers such Gstreamer plugin developed for the Linux release to enable to support for HW accelerated HTML5 video. There has been a lot of progress made on up streaming drivers for Snapdragon processors. For latest Linaro Linux release, visit: http://releases.linaro.org/latest/ubuntu/snapdragon For information on development boards based on Snapdragon processor, visit http://mydragonboard.org/. For Inforce Computing’s single-board-computers based on Snapdragon processors, visit http://inforcecomputing.com/products/inforce_products.html

Infineon shows €16 ARM Cortex-M0 XMC1100 Starter Kit Development Board with free DAVE “Digital Application Virtual Engineer”

Posted by – March 3, 2015

Matthias Ackermann, Industrial Microcontrollers at Infineon Technologies presents the latest technologies around its XMC 32-bit industrial microcontroller families powered by ARM Cortex-M and a new version of DAVE in action – 600W LLC titanium class power conversion reference design using XMC4000 series, XMC MCU buck kit evaluation platform for XMC MCUs, 1kW BLDC power tool reference design using XMC1300 series, 2-axis FOC motor control using XMC4400 series, MATLAB Simulink coder library integration in DAVE, secure field update/upgrade for XMC4000 series, 24GHz radar for presence and distance detection, flicker-free LED lighting control with RGB LED lighting shield for Arduino.

The Infineon demos show typical use cases and implementations utilizing XMC MCUs that feature deterministic behavior (programmable hardware interconnect matrix), performance (with DSP and FPU or MATH co-processor enabling 32-bit DIV and 24-bit trigonometric calculations), accuracy (peripherals clock up to 120MHz, HRPWM with 150ps), full control (timer concatenate up to 64-bit, POSIF), integration (ΔΣ Demodulator, LED Brightness Color Control Unit), and flexible programmable communication interfaces for M2M and IoT.

The demos use DAVE. DAVE stands for “Digital Application Virtual Engineer”. It is the free of charge software development platform for XMC MCUs offering a configurable and reusable code repository called XMC Lib (low level driver) and DAVE APPs.

kernelci.org upstream kernel validation project

Posted by – February 28, 2015

Tyler Baker discusses and demos http://kernelci.org, where development boards all over the world are being booted with the bleeding edge upstream kernel to provide validation results to the kernel community.