ARM OP1 Powered Samsung Chromebook Plus shipping on February 12th

Posted by Charbax – February 10, 2017

You can buy the $449 Samsung Chromebook Plus Powered by 64bit ARM OP1 Hexacore RK3399-C dual ARM Cortex-A72 and quad ARM Cortex-A53 with Mali-T860 GPU shipping out on Sunday at Amazon.com

As Intel's usual tactic when feeling under threat by disruptive ARM Powered technology, Intel is trying to confuse consumers by shipping out their buggy Intel core-m3 Samsung Chromebook Pro version to reviewers here, here, here, here and here.

TheVerge reports that Android apps support on Intel is horrible compared to the ARM Powered OP1 Chromebook:

consider that this ARM processor may do a better job of running most Android apps than the Intel processor on the Chromebook Pro. Those apps need to be translated from ARM code to x86 to run on Intel machines. However, the Android beta on the Chromebook Pro is in such a sorry state that I can't really judge. Google promises that it'll all be fixed by April, when the Pro launches. Right now, the Plus handles Android apps much better than the Pro.

The situation on the Plus is miles better than the situation on the Intel-based Chromebook Pro right now, which is so riddled with bugs and issues that I declined reviewing it in favor of this Plus. I describe in more detail the situation in another article, here.

As I suggested in my article demonstrating how OP1 is a Rockchip RK3399-C:

OP1 is optimized for the Chromebook market, with optimal performance, power consumption and price point. Optimized for smooth performance on high resolution display, dual USB Type-C, reliable Wi-Fi, 4K playback, it uses GPU Compute to optimize the performance of every aspect of the Chrome OS web browsing UI. Fonts, scrolling, displaying images, animations, video, all is optimized, improved and accelerated also by the Mali-T860 GPU. Unlike Intel x86 Chromebooks, I believe that the OP1 platform runs all Android apps natively without emulation, that is especially important for running advanced Android apps optimized for productivity, such as Microsoft Word, Excell, Powerpoint, OfficeSuite, PDF Editor, Free Office, Docs to Go, Google Drive, Polaris Office, Quip, WPS Office and thousands of other productivity apps already available on Android, and thousands of advanced games on Android, all these apps are optimized for ARM, with Native Code in them that just runs better on ARM. I would guess that running any of these thousands of advanced Android apps might consume half the power to run on ARM compared with x86.