$25 ARM Powered Desktop presented by Raspberry Pi Foundation

Posted by – May 6, 2011

The Raspberry Pi Foundation (a UK non-profit) plans to develop, manufacture and distribute an ultra-low-cost computer, for use in teaching computer programming to children. They expect this computer to have many other applications both in the developed and the developing world. Their first product is about the size of a USB key, and is designed to plug into a TV or be combined with a touch screen for a low cost tablet. The expected price is $25 for a fully-configured system.

Here are the specs:

  • 700MHz ARM11
  • 128MB of SDRAM
  • OpenGL ES 2.0
  • 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode
  • Composite and HDMI video output
  • USB 2.0
  • SD/MMC/SDIO memory card slot
  • General-purpose I/O
  • Open software (Ubuntu, Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)

And who exactly is it targeted at, well, students. It runs Ubuntu and will come preloaded with educational applications. Suggestions for it’s use and recommendations of software are welcome through email. Oh, and it’s purported to cost only $25… Head on over to their site Raspberry Pi.

Video posted by Rory Cellan-Jones on http://bbc.co.uk

This post was submitted by Jon Hubert Bristol on the Submit News page here at http://armdevices.net/submit-news/. If you have any other awesome ARM related news, you are welcome to post it here!

  • Anonymous

    Holy shit that’s cheap! Please don’t go the way of OLPC and sell it only to children.

  • Maventwo

    But the OLPC project is for children in poor countries where the OLPC is thought to be a tool for learn to write and usually schoolwork not for learning program making and computer skills.

    OLPC and Rasberry Pi is nog competing on same market.

    Both OLPC and Rasberry Pi is needed.

  • Anne O’nymouse

    Shame the “monitor” will cost a lot more.

  • Anonymous

    I think you misunderstood. I compared it to OLPC only for their (imho very poor) choice of not selling it on the mass market (like me). If could buy this PCB and it also has SPI, I have lots of ideas/projects I’d use it for. Probably even for 2x the price.

  • http://ARMdevices.net/ Charbax

    OLPC is open source and free for any distributor to distribute to the mass market if they so wish to. Intel grabbed the OLPC idea and released theirs to the mass market. About 150 million people have now bought an Intel powered OLPC clone so-called netbook.

    The idea of OLPC is to move things forward in the industry. OLPC has no preference for the one or the other component to be the one used in western computer markets, OLPC just wants cheaper and better devices that are better suited for educational use with the 1 billion Children currently waiting for better education in the developing world.

  • http://ARMdevices.net/ Charbax

    Yup, the $75 OLPC XO-3 includes a capacitive touch-screen Pixel Qi screen, battery, wireless, storage and more..

  • Pingback: Länksprutning – 7 May 2011 – Månhus

  • NeverEver

    Never ever is this going to sell for $25.

    Same Vaporware as this cheap India Tablet from some time ago.

  • Pingback: Raspberry Pi Foundation Develop a $25 Computer | Technostats

  • Pingback: LTG Episode 48: Old Macdonald had a farm | Let's Talk Geek

  • Pingback: Raspberry Pi $25 ARM Desktop PCB Alpha boards now in manufacture – ARMdevices.net

  • http://www.bestbusinessbaydeals.com/ business bay

    Genuinely terrific blog I’ll certainly be returning to have a look at it every day later on

  • Lamchi

    we need to combine it wit a low cost LCD to really making it usable in third world countries with no TV and HDMI????LCD???? or maybe add a small solar battery to power it.

  • http://www.seoserviceaz.com Arizona SEO

    Herman Hollerith invented the recording of data on a machine readable medium. Prior uses of machine readable media, above, had been for control, not data. “After some initial trials with paper tape, he settled on punched cards”.

  • http://www.swindonsilicon.co.uk/ IC Design

    A number of projects to develop computers based on the stored-program architecture commenced around this time,