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Foxconn magiXcube 400

Posted by Charbax – June 3, 2009

Cywee 3D motion controller

Posted by Charbax – June 3, 2009

IAC Prodigy E-Reader

Posted by Charbax – June 3, 2009

IAC Prodigy is the first E-Ink device with built-in Wimax, HSDPA, Evdo and WiFi networking as well as a touchscreen input.

Nvidia Tegra: Overview by Michael Rayfield

Posted by Charbax – June 3, 2009

Overview of Nvidia Tegra by Michael Rayfield, general manager of the mobile business unit, showing the new line of $100-$200 laptops runing Android or Windows CE on an embedded ARM11 processor and Nvidia's awesome 1080p and advanced 3D graphics capable Nvidia Tegra chipset.

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Pixel Qi screen demo Live from Taipei

Posted by Charbax – June 2, 2009

This is it, the revolutionary LCD screen by Pixel Qi that turns your netbook into a Kindle by the flip of a switch. As you can see in this video, thanks to Pixel Qi technology, your next LCD screens can now be very usable outdoors as well under the sunlight, in a very high resolution black and white mode and also keep a full color and bright back light indoors mode.

This is a demonstration from the first batch of the first working prototypes of this screen, and as you can see, it already looks amazing. Mass production of these screens are planned to be launched soon and should be available in any netbook (and later other devices such as smartphones) as long as the manufacturers decide that they want to integrate it in their products.

Find more informations about this screen at http://pixelqi.com

You can click on the pictures to see them in full 5 megapixel qualities:

Pixel Qi 3Qi in black and white mode

Pixel Qi 3Qi in black and white mode

Pixel Qi 3Qi in color mode

Pixel Qi 3Qi in color mode

BenQ Joybee GP1 mini Projector review

Posted by Charbax – May 31, 2009

Review showing this very compact and light 3LED projector, one of the first in the world with built-in USB host functionality to playback DivX mpeg4 files from a USB flash memory or from a FAT32 formatted hard drive. It has great colors and performs great for its size. Having a built-in USB reader means you can play movies on it directly without the need to use a computer or a video player device to playback the video formats. Yet the BenQ Joybee GP1 mini projector does not yet support Mp3 audio nor AC3 audio in DivX/XviD Mpeg4 files, thus audio contents has to be re-encoded mostly thus far to the PCM or the AAC format. BenQ can update the firmware so I will update this description if I hear any confirmation by them that they are adding Mp3 audio support on it.

These type of super compact 3LED projectors are getting cheap enough, bright enough, sharp enough, with very nice colors and easy to use enough so I think that it may become a very popular product.

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Archos 5 TV Snap-On review

Posted by Charbax – May 25, 2009

Review of the Archos 5 TV Snap-On accessory that let's you watch and record DVB-T (freeview) signals city-wide and country-wide for most European countries which already have good DVB-T coverage. It comes with a dual diversity antenna system that allows you to get the best reception for a mobile DVB-T receiver, it picks in real-time the best available signal while you walk around or move your device around when at the football match, at work, in school, on the bus, on the train, anywhere especially in densely populated areas which have good DVB-T coverage.

You can discuss this video at http://forum.archosfans.com/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=23754

Archos 2 review

Posted by Charbax – May 25, 2009

Review of the Archos 2 mp3 player, the current cheapest mp3 player with 4GB ($39), 8GB ($59) and 16GB ($99) having such a nice color 1.8" LCD screen for videos and pictures. It's main selling point is that it's much cheaper than the competing devices by Sandisk, Dell, and Apple's ipod nano.

You can discuss this video at http://forum.archosfans.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=23755

ARM and Android, the future of laptops

Posted by Charbax – April 1, 2009

The main goal of the OLPC, and thus, of the whole computer industry at this point, is to lower the cost of laptops by lowering the power consumption. The best way to achieve that, is to limit the way applications get full native access to the deep internals of the computer system. Intel’s X86 standard and Microsoft’s Windows OS were designed only for that multi-purpose backwards compatibility where the same unoptimized bloated software would work across thousands of hardware configurations with often full root access to the deepest internals of a computer system. For most of the applications that most people need, you do not need full native code support in third party applications. By limiting full native access for third party applications, you take care in one swoop of all the security problems that one has on Intel and Microsoft based PC and laptops. You basically make spyware, viruses, hacking and all of those problems impossible by design.

That is how Android is made. Android provides a totally sandboxed JAVA-based software layer, which only interacts with the hardware features through totally controllable software-to-hardware APIs. With Android on ARM, you have a complete shift in the way third party applications are run compared to X86 Windows XP/7, MacOSX and even most of those X86 Desktop Linux distributions that have been going around, including Ubuntu and Fedora.

The open source native Android Linux code hacking happens exclusively at the manufacturer stage. Which means, you want to have a manufacturer in control of everything, you want the manufacturer to customize Android for the very specific mass produced hardware in question, providing all the standard and non-standard software-to-hardware APIs for third party software developers to gain access to the all of the devices standard or special hardware features.

What you have backing Android is the worlds absolute best company in Google, comprised of the worlds largest concentration of PHDs and Engineers with the most experience in Web and computer technology. The role of Google with Android is to make sure that the native Android code works in the most optimal fashion with the most optimal hardware configurations that manufacturers are making for it. Google helps manufacturers prepare that Android native code customization for each different System On Chip, for each different variation on the ARM Cortex processor profiles by each of the industry leading ARM processor manufacturers among Texas Instruments, Qualcomm, Broadcom, Freescale, Samsung, Nvidia, Marvell and others.

If you want to change the default Android user interface layer and make it look more like the Sugar User Interface layer (which for XO-1 was built on top of an optimized X86 Fedora Linux installation), you definitely can do those changes and customizations. Those would come from the manufacturers, thus in the case of OLPC from the whole OLPC organization, in cooperation with Google or anyone else helping to create a more education-laptop friendly user interface. But Android applications remain the same, and appart from slight porting that can be required, all Android applications are designed to work in full screen mode, and management of multi-tasking, notifications, memory and processing power consumption, all those are managed the same way accros all implementations of the Android OS.

HP has just announced that they are working to support Android in future HP Laptops. Asus has also announced to be working on Android laptops. Look forward to Android ruling over all ARM Laptop implementations, at least for these where the lowest cost and the lowest power consumption levels have been achieved. Look forward to $100 Android ARM laptops. Look forward to the empire of Intel and Microsoft crumbling under the inevitable hardware and software revolution that comes with the XO-2 and with the whole industry’s shift to lower cost, lower power consumption using ARM and Android in all laptops.

Hanvon Touchscreen E-Book

Posted by Charbax – March 19, 2009

Hanvon shows a 5" touchscreen E-Ink E-Book reader device. The size of the screen I think could be perfect for the device to be pocketable, if they can just remove all the unecessary screen bezel before the release of this product. The touchscreen feature using the special stylus has also a huge potential in terms of building software features for it once the device is connected to the Internet using WiFi or HSDPA, to enable readers to collaborate online on editing texts, on commenting and building communities of handwritten annotations around texts. A USB or Bluetooth keyboard could then be connected to enter typed annotations as well.

Youtube links:
HD quality (2mbit/s, 1280x720 h264, 44hz stereo audio)
Normal quality (350kbit/s, 320×180 sorenson, 22hz mono audio)