Category: Linaro Connect

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Aaron Welch, SVP of Product, Packet Hosting Inc

Posted by Charbax – November 30, 2017

Interview with Aaron Welch, SVP of Product at about what he said in his keynote, about the ARM Servers which they are providing as bare metal hosting at and what he thinks the internet will be like in the next ten years, probably powered by ARM Servers which they will provide.

@vielmetti talks ARM Servers at and @worksonarm

Posted by Charbax – November 30, 2017

Interview with Ed Vielmetti, Special Projects Director at talking about their available and upcoming ARMv8 servers in the data center and the ARM Server ecosystem that is being advanced at a rapid pace. Ed Vielmetti is posting News and software updates at and

Canonical shows EdgeX on ARM

Posted by Charbax – November 30, 2017

First demo of EdgeX on ARM in cross-host setup featuring Ubuntu Core and Ubuntu systems both running the EdgeX cluster. The Dell 5k Edge Gateway, based on Ubuntu Core Snappy, has been running the core EdgeX services (basically 11 out of 12) using the official Docker snap. The RPi3, based on Ubuntu, has been running EdgeX device virtual service.

The EdgeX Foundry Project is a vendor-neutral project launched by the Linux Foundation, aligned around a common goal: the simplification and standardization of the foundation for edge computing architectures in the Industrial IoT market, while still allowing the ecosystem to add significant value. The seed for the new project is a fully-functional, Alpha-grade edge platform based on over 125,000 lines of code donated by Dell with references to other open source projects and developed with feedback from their partners, customers, and even competitors. The EdgeX project has already garnered a diverse and experienced membership base of supporting companies that is continuing the development of the architecture and code base. The goals of EdgeX include to provide a flexible microservices architecture that can support the use of any combination of heterogeneous ingredients plugged into a common interoperability foundation, to be agnostic to hardware CPU (e.g., x86, ARM), OS (e.g., Linux, Windows, Mac OS), and application environment (e.g., Java, JavaScript, Python, Go Lang, C/C++) to support customer preferences for differentiation, to allow services to scale up and down based on device capability and use case and more.

David Abdurachmanov of CERN talks High Energy Physics on ARMv8 64bit Servers at Linaro Connect

Posted by Charbax – November 10, 2017

Around the year 2000, the convergence on Linux and commodity x86_64 processors provided a homogeneous scientific computing platform which enabled the construction of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) for LHC data processing. This allowed the High Energy Physics (HEP) community to use a homogeneous software model utilizing the x86_64 architecture. LHC experiments at CERN, in particular ATLAS and CMS, started investigating ARMv8 64-bit (AArch64) architecture for HEP needs. A journey which started in 2013. The LHC community faces a great challenge regarding computing needs in 10 years and has started exploring public clouds, volunteer computing (e.g., LHC@home) and HPC facilities to increase peak computation capacity. This talk will contain information about future (a timeline of 10 years) computation needs for LHC experiments and the more recent progress done by ATLAS, CernVM and CMS teams on using ARMv8 64-bit/AArch64.

You can watch the keynote by David Abdurachmanov and Jakob Blomer here:

Hungarian Robot Builders Association

Posted by juliusaugustus – November 7, 2017

The Hungarian Robot Builders association is a club of people which builds and designs robots. The association has all the Top robot builders and designers in Hungary. The association designs and builds robots for competitions throughout Europe. Raspberry Pi's and Arduinos are their favored boards.

David Rusling, Linaro CTO talks Trebble, Servers, HPC, Tiny Linux IoTL, Automotive, Machine Learning

Posted by Charbax – October 10, 2017

David Rusling says this has been the best Linaro Connect for him thus far in the 7 years since Linaro was started. He talks about how Google recognizes the part Linaro can play to help with Project Trebble, to help keep longer term support for each LTS kernel release also as part of the Linaro Mobile Group. The Linaro Enterprise Day showed how far Linaro has gotten to with all the work coming together towards ARM Servers taking market share in the server market. Kanta Vekaria works towards Linaro's involvment with High Performance Computing (HPC) as she talked about in her keynote Nicolas Pitre is working on making the Internet of Tiny Linux (IoTL) to make Linux suitable for IoT you can see his talk here persuading the kernel developers that making changes that benefit the embedded market. Linaro is very active with Zephyr which is kind of the Linux Kernel of the embedded world, working on it in in the Linaro IoT & Embedded Group (LITE). Talking about the establishment of the Open Source Foundries spin-off of Linaro where they can pursue business opportunities to work more closely together with customers who need help implementing open source on ARM solutions such as the IoT solutions shown in this video also introducing the Associate Membership Level for smaller members such as small to medium companies and Universities to be able to join Linaro in the coming months trying to involve everyone in the open source ecosystem. Linaro also is looking into getting involved with open source for the Automotive market possibly related to the software needed for self-driving cars and more. Linaro getting involved with open source for artificial intelligence, machine learning. You can see my previous videos with David Rusling over the past 5 years here.

Jon Masters, Red Hat Chief ARM Architect at Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017

Posted by Charbax – October 10, 2017

Jon Masters says Moores Law may have come to an end and that single threaded performance is not defining the industry anymore because it's not increasing at the same rate that it used to. What is defining the future of the industry is machine learning, accelerators, lots of additional workload optimization that is happening outside of the core. Thus he believes ARM has an opportunity to get into the mainstream server space in the next 12-18 months with the newest powerful ARM Server solutions such as the Cavium ThunderX2 and the Qualcomm Centriq 2400. You can see some of my previous Jon Masters interviews over the past 5 years here.

Paul McKenney of IBM talks RCU, Quantum Computing at Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017

Posted by Charbax – October 10, 2017

I previously interviewed Paul McKenney at Linaro Connect 5 years ago in Hong Kong here, since then he has been working with a lot of things at IBM and this is the first time he's back at Linaro Connect since that initial interview. He says there might be 20 Billion Linux machines in the world, most of them running on ARM, all of them have Paul McKenney's Read-Copy Update (RCU) code in them.

Read-copy update (RCU) is a synchronization mechanism that was added to the Linux kernel in October of 2002. RCU achieves scalability improvements by allowing reads to occur concurrently with updates. In contrast with conventional locking primitives that ensure mutual exclusion among concurrent threads regardless of whether they be readers or updaters, or with reader-writer locks that allow concurrent reads but not in the presence of updates, RCU supports concurrency between a single updater and multiple readers. RCU ensures that reads are coherent by maintaining multiple versions of objects and ensuring that they are not freed up until all pre-existing read-side critical sections complete. RCU defines and uses efficient and scalable mechanisms for publishing and reading new versions of an object, and also for deferring the collection of old versions. These mechanisms distribute the work among read and update paths in such a way as to make read paths extremely fast. In some cases (non-preemptable kernels), RCU's read-side primitives have zero overhead.

Open Source Foundries IoT Zephyr, Linux, IoT Gateways, Bluetooth Mesh microPlatforms demo

Posted by Charbax – October 10, 2017

Open Source Foundries is a spin off company off of Linaro, composed of a talented group of engineers to work more directly with companies, OEMs, ODMs, small, medium to large companies to bring new open source products and solutions more rapidly to the market. Leveraging all the work done by Linaro and speeding up the time to market, enable rapid product development, here demonstrating some of the open source IoT solutions provided based on Zephyr on ARM Cortex-M and Linux on ARM Cortex-A using the Linaro Technologies Division (LTD) microPlatforms system.

The lack of a secure IoT solution has the industry scrambling. The Open Source Foundries team believes that a world can exist in which all connected devices can be secured and updated in a timely fashion. In this demonstration shown at the Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017, the team showcases its secure end to end FOTA (firmware over the air) solution implementing the latest in connected technologies.

At Open Source Foundries, software is their passion, hacking hardware is their favorite past time, so they have created the OSLight project to convert off the shelf hardware into secure connected devices. They have inserted a Red Bear NRF52 BLE Nano 2 into these lamps, to allow them to communicate over BLE with various cloud services. In the first demo, they demonstrate creating a secure BLE mesh network with these lamps. They show the ability to securely pass messages through the mesh network to control the state of the LED lamp. The next demo shows a set of 96Boards Nitrogens sending temperature data to the SoftBank IoT Cloud with the ONEM2M protocol using 6lowpan over BLE. The third and final demo introduces a variant of the OSLight project, a fully 3D printed light bulb. Instead of a simple LED array it has a 12 LED WRGB NeoPixel which is powered by line voltage, stepped down to 5VDC.

For microcontrollers, they offer their Zephyr microplatform, an open source software reference based on Zephyr RTOS and MCUboot. This software stack implements secure boot, unified microkernel, and IP (TCP or UDP) using 6lowpan over BLE. At the protocol level they've embraced industry standards such as LWM2M/ONEM2M/HTTPS/MQTT to provide an array of options for their customers, whilst ensuring no vendor lock in. Open Source Foundries subscribers are offered continuous validated software updates throughout the life of their product for a fixed monthly subscription fee.

On the gateway, they offer their Linux microplatform, which is again, an open source reference based on the latest Linux kernel version, and a minimal Yocto based userspace with a container runtime (Docker). By isolated the OS from the containers, each can be updated independently while providing limitless potential for the applications it can run. For updates they again implement standards, and stay vendor neutral to allow their customers to choose the solution that is right for them. Continuous validated updates for the OS and containers are also offered for this platform for a reasonable fixed monthly fee.

Gordon Kruberg, Gumstix CEO, inventor of the HDMI Stick at Linaro Connect San Francisco 2017

Posted by Charbax – October 9, 2017

Gordon Kruberg, President, CEO and Founder of Gumstix Inc. In 2004, they launched the world's first HDMI Stick Computer and they also invented the first SOM running Linux and computers were officially introduced with Gumstix first motherboard alongside the Waysmall computer, about the size of a stick of gum. Apple bought many of these to do their initial testing of iOS on ARM to try to have a smooth UI to work on ARM early. Gumstix now has an online tool called Geppetto that allows users to design their own PCB boards which can be used in combination with boards from TechNexion and Toradex, in 2013 it started a crowd-funding service to allow a group of users that want to get a custom design manufactured to share the costs to start manufacturing any new PCB idea. A new PCB idea can be made through Gumstix Gepetto for a $2000 setup manufacturing fee then payments for each board. They estimate that any project needing to design and manufacture custom PCB boards in quantities lower than 20 thousand pieces, that they are providing the most cost effective and fastest time to market.