Category: Ubuntu

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64bit HiKey Board selling at $129 through Arrow Electronics

Posted by Charbax – February 17, 2015

Arrow Electronics is the world's biggest distributor of electronics components, they are a supporting partner in the Hi-Key development board, supported by the new program. With experience in distributing many different previous developments like the TI based Beaglebone, Arrow is excited for the things to come in this space. This is the world’s first affordable 64bit ARM development board for software developers, makers, and OEMs. It comes with 4GB of eMMC, WiFi/BLE, and HDMI output. You can order yours today for $129 at

Hisilicon D02, 16-core ARM Cortex-A57 High Performance Board (32-core version coming next months!)

Posted by Charbax – February 15, 2015

Hisilicon engineer Justin Zhao, Software Architect at Hisilicon SoC architecture department, is bringing up the Linux software on the Hisilicon D02 Board, one of the most powerful ARM Processors in the world. They have a configuration with 32-core Cortex A57 @ max 2.1GHz and up to 2 SoC per board coming up within a few months (64-cores per board!), each SoC has 1MB L2 cache/cluser, 32MB L3 cache. The board has 12 SATA\SAS (8 for one SoC, 4 for the other), 2 10/100/1000Mb/s compatible Ethernet ports, 2 10Gb/s SFP+ Ethernet ports, 8 DDR3 RAM DIMMs, 4 PCIE solts (2 pieces/SoC), 2 UARTs & 2 JTAGs for debug, 1 USB host. Rob Savoye of Linaro's Toolchain Group joins in this video discussing the installation of the latest GCC to this Board. Justin Zhao shows how he can bootup from Sata, PXE, Provision mode, NFS, with OpenSuse 13.1, Ubuntu 14.04, working on Red Hat. A LAMP (LAVA) and lxc (container) have already been enabled, and some Benchmarks (e.g. perf, iperf, ltp) have been executed on it too, perhaps Hisilicon will soon publish the test results also.

96Boards Linaro Development Boards Initiative, $129 HiKey with Hisilicon 64bit Kirin620

Posted by Charbax – February 12, 2015

With the first being the Hislicon Kirin620 Octa Core ARM Cortex-A53 based $129 HiKey development board, is a new open hardware specification for ARM 32bit and 64bit development boards, and a Community Program for software delivery to developers, makers and OEMs. In this video, Linaro CEO George Grey describes the standardized expansion buses for peripheral I/O, display and cameras allowing the hardware ecosystem to develop a range of compatible add-on products that will work on any 96Boards product over the lifetime of the platform.The 96Boards initiative is designed to offer a single software and hardware community across multiple vendor boards supporting a range of different features. A fixed set of minimum functions including USB, SD, HDMI and standardized low speed and high speed peripheral connectors are provided. Vendors may add customized hardware and feature sets provided the minimum functions are available. Linaro expects this to extend the platform life, increase the market for add-on hardware, and accelerate open source upstreaming of support for new SoC features.

Here is the session by Linaro CEO George Grey talking further about the 96Boards hardware at Linaro Connect Hong Kong 2015:

Live Lava Lab demonstration, adding new development boards for automatic testing

Posted by Charbax – February 8, 2015

Showing how easy it is to integrate any development board in Lava. Beaglebone Black, Allwinner A20 Cubieboard2, IFC6410, Odroid-UX3 (Exynos5422). They can take any new board and just get it connected. LAVA is an automated validation architecture primarily aimed at testing deployments of systems based around the Linux kernel on ARM devices, specifically ARMv7 and later. The current range of boards (device types) supported by this LAVA instance can be seen on the scheduler status page which includes details of how many boards of each type are available for tests and currently running jobs.

eInfochips enabling Linux support on ARM based SoCs

Posted by Charbax – February 8, 2015

They have enabled the Qualcomm Snapdragon APQ8064 (Snapdragon 600) with Linaro's Linaro OpenEmbedded based Ubuntu release. They have optimized it for video/audio capture encode/decode through software based encoding and optimizing HD resolution with hardware acceleration for video-chat.

Linaro Performance Contest, John Maddog Hall

Posted by Charbax – February 8, 2015

At, in anticipation of ARM’s new 64-bit architecture, Linaro reviewed some of the source code of a typical GNU/Linux system and found over 1400 source code modules that included ARM assembly language which might need to be ported and does need to be tested to work on new ARM 64-bit processors (Aarch64).
Linaro also recognized that some of the modules were written a long time ago (by computer standards) when CPUs were single core and not multi-core, compilers were not as optimized and RAM memories were smaller and more expensive leading to trade-offs in portability and algorithm selection. In today’s era, it might be better to re-evaluate the use of assembly language and perhaps replace it completely with a higher-level language such as “C”. It might also be worthwhile to review algorithms that made sense in an earlier time, but have outlived their usefulness.
In some cases the assembly language that exists in the code was “transposed” from existing assembly language of a different architecture and did not necessarily utilize the best features of each assembly or machine language architecture. In other cases it might make more sense to create a compiler intrinsic to do certain functions such as identifying the architecture of the machine.
Finally, while the code in the modules may be very efficient and highly portable, the compiler invocations may need review to take advantage of new optimization switches.
All this amounts to a major opportunity to not only ensure GNU/Linux based systems will operate efficiently on new ARM 64-bit processors, but also to optimize the performance of these systems across architectures. In pursuit of this performance goal, Linaro decided to create a long-running performance contest directed at these modules, and in the future extend the contest to even more modules which may or may not have assembler language in them.
To get started, click on the “Getting Started” Tux Penguin:

pcDuino Acadia 1, Freescale i.MX6 Quad Development Board with Arduino Headers

Posted by Charbax – January 27, 2015

pcDuino Acadia 1, powered by Freescale i.MX6 Quad processor with 1 GB RAM, 8GB eMMC, 2 SD card interface, 2 camera interface, other common ports, and Arduino hearders in order to connect Arduino shields to this Linux/Android board. It has IR receiver, up to 6 buttons. With Ubuntu 12.04 and Android 4.4 support for the board, as well as the usual API and development tools available for other pcDuino boards, you can read more about it here:

You can contact the pcDuino team here:
Mobbile: +86 186 0272 9237
QQ: 18227904
Wechat: minisky002

Mobile: +86 18664537463
skype: pillar_zuo
QQ: 471044839

Moile: +86 13036151639

Enplug Digital Signage Software

Posted by Charbax – January 13, 2015

Enplug, winner of CES's ShowStoppers Startup Competition, is the developer of the first public computing platform. Enplug's software turns any display into a public computer, enabling businesses to seamlessly engage with their audience. Businesses with displays of all sizes use Enplug to show interactive and live social media feeds, news, games, and many other apps developed by third-parties. Enplug wants to partner with display and set-top box makers to have its software pre-loaded for free and revenue-share with the hardware maker. It is looking for other display and set-top box makers to work with you can contact them here by phone: +1-855-536-7584 or email:

AppliedMicro X-Gene ARM Server Software Status and Performance

Posted by Charbax – January 3, 2015

In this video, AppliedMicro’s Kumar Sankaran discusses the software of the X-Gene platform and provides a comparison of X-Gene 1 and 2 against the latest Intel server processors Xeon E5.

Also see Tour at AppliedMicro's X-Gene Testing Lab
How the AppliedMicro X-Gene ARM Server Processors are designed
and AppliedMicro launching X-C1 Dev Board for 64bit Android development

You can order AppliedMicro's 64bit ARMv8 development board here:

How the AppliedMicro X-Gene ARM Server Processors are designed

Posted by Charbax – December 11, 2014

AppliedMicro gives an overview of X-Gene, providing the different design components as well the various benefits in using X-Gene for compute server, storage and high performance computing. AppliedMicro is one of the initial partners with ARM in developing the ARMv8 64bit architecture, and customizing it for high performance server computing.

Also see Tour at AppliedMicro's X-Gene Testing Lab
and AppliedMicro launching X-C1 Dev Board for 64bit Android development