Category: Intel

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Lenovo IdeaPad U300s Ultrabook, $1199 starting price

Posted by Charbax – September 1, 2011

Lenovo is launching this new Ultrabook based on the second generation Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors, pricing starts at $1199, goes up perhaps to about $1999 with all kinds of options in terms of dual or quad core processor, 128GB or 256GB SSD memory, 2GB, 4GB or 8GB RAM. They have done some ventilation design so there are no vents under the laptop, it's aluminium everywhere, so it stays cold under the laptop even though this is a quite powerful new processor.

Honeycomb is shown on the Intel Oak Trail Atom at Computex 2011

Posted by Charbax – June 1, 2011

Here I filmed a video with one of Intel's software product managers who worked on porting Android Honeycomb over to the Intel Atom platform. Those reference tablets shown at Computex 2011, they are heavy, hot, fat, battery runtime is probably short while battery is much larger, some seem to run really slow through the UI, they are probably expensive. Though it's interesting that after Google TV, Chromebook, Google is also not making it impossible for Intel to try to do whatever they can to try to keep up with change. I've tried to ask some Intel people if they plan to licence the ARM architechture, or/and to start manufacturing ARM Processors for Apple, Sony or others, and they seem to tell me that why not, could be possible, just rumors, but who knows..

3Gnet makes Intel Powered UMPC designs

Posted by Charbax – April 22, 2011

They make some of the famous Intel powered UMPC designs. I still think that those seem to be expensive, heavy, thick and slow to use which is why the ARM Powered tablets are #winning.

Shenzhen Hongda Technology manufactures $260 14″ Intel Atom laptop

Posted by Charbax – April 22, 2011

Another look into the factory of Shenzhen Hongda Technology (see Shenzhen Behind the Scenes 1: Hongda Factory tour) where they manufacture for example this $260 14" Intel Atom powered laptop.

Erathink.com Intel z550 Windows tablet

Posted by Charbax – April 13, 2011

Some thin looking Intel Atom x550 tablets, but they are still heavy, probably expensive, and probably don't get very long battery runtime.

Lenovo LePad Qualcomm Snapdragon Tablet U1 that docks in Intel core i5 laptop

Posted by Charbax – January 5, 2011

The Lenovo ARM Powered tablet is $500 and the optional Intel laptop dock part is something like $800. Lenovo had shown this last year with a previous Snapdragon and Thunderbird's customized Ubuntu Linux on the ARM part which I filmed then, but now they updated the ARM part to Android 2.2 on Qualcomm's 8X50A is 1.3ghz 45nm processor (which they might upgrade to Qualcomm's dual-core processor by the time this tablet comes out with Android Honeycomb), they say it'll upgrade to Honeycomb, and it uses Lenovo's LeAndroid UI layer (similar to LePhone UI that is available on the Chinese market, notice Paul Otelinni at Lenovo's Aquanox party in the background of my last year's LePhone video) as default home replacement.

NewTek TriCaster TCXD850 and NewTek TriCaster TCXD300 released

Posted by Charbax – September 12, 2010

TriCaster TCXD850 is a 26'000€ real-time video editing Windows box with some Intel processors inside and a lot of connectors. Basically it allows for HD live tv editing in a box. But it's really expensive and I wonder if a regular ARM Powered or Intel Powered laptop with the right software couldn't do most of the same basic multi-camera live editing kind of things.

MasterPad, 11.6″ Capacitive Intel Pineview N450 64Bit Tablet

Posted by Charbax – September 5, 2010

Cyber1 Ltd is releasing this full Windows 7 Home Premium tablet on a Intel Pineview N450, 11.6" capacitive touch screen tablet, 1GB/2GB RAM, 32GB/64GB SSD, priced similarly to the iPad, release October. 1080p video support, video-chat, 2 USB host, HDMI output, SD card reader, optional 3G sim slot.

ViewSonic ViewPad 100 dual-boots Android and Windows 7 on Intel Atom N455 tablet

Posted by Charbax – September 3, 2010

This is a 549€ Intel Atom N455 based 10.1" capacitive tablet. It can reboot into Android for X86.

brightsideofnews.com: Banchmark comparisons of ARM Cortex A8 against Intel Atom N450

Posted by Charbax – April 14, 2010

At about 3x lower power consumption, much lower heat dissipation and much lower overall system pricing, the Freescale i.MX515 platform in a development board developed by Pegatron, is used for benchmarks of all kinds of performance areas by processor benchmarking expert Van Smith at this 9-page benchmarking article at brightsideofnews.com

While this specific ARM Cortex A8 implementation performs great on integers, power consumption, heat dissipation, price, floating-point performance still needs some improvement with ARM Cortex designs to come. Consider also that Ubuntu 9.04 used in this test is only the first implementation of Ubuntu for ARM Cortex and that Ubuntu 10.4 which is imminently going to be released will significantly improve ARM performance of those benchmarks.

The ARM Cortex-A8 sample that we tested in the form of the Freescale i.MX515 lived in an ecosystem that was not competitive with the x86 rivals in this comparison. The video subsystem is very limited. Memory support is a very slow 32-bit, DDR2-200MHz.

I guess it's not yet possible for Van Smith in this test to make an apples to apples comparison as the current ARM Cortex A8 are still oriented at Smart Phones and thin and light Tablets rather than full SmartBooks for full desktop-like performance requirements of the more desktop-performance oriented next generation ARM Cortex designs.

The goal for ARM when reaching the markets of Laptop and Desktop form factors is to reach the level of performance required to run full high resolution Web Browsers at full speed, where the OS with the browser boots instantly, with fast enough RAM where unlimited tabs open instantly, where hardware acceleration of embedded videos functions smoothly and where even the Native Client and 3D features run fully within the ARM Powered Web Browser. Once that level of performance is reached, further performance improvements will be less important than lowering the power consumption and lowering the cost of the next processors. Once everything most users need to have processed on their devices seem to run instantly, reaching the instant browser performance level, why would anyone want to increase the performance of client device oriented processors further?

You can find the benchmarks at: brightsideofnews.com

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